FOREVER FRIEND: This white rabbit is “pretty happy-go-lucky.”

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He’s a honey of a bunny who’s “very smart and engaged.”

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That would be Dr. Hopkinz, a neutered, 2-year-old male American rabbit, who is available for adoption at the Toronto Humane Society.

The bunny has been at the THS since January, after a brief adoption in March, but was returned a few weeks later says spokesperson Hannah Sotropa.

“The reason was behavioural – he was nipping in the previous home,” said Sotropa.

“But the last update says no more nipping so far. They also had him for a very short time as well. It does take bunnies a little while to adjust into a new environment, a new home. With Dr. Hopkinz specifically, he does love his people once he’s gotten a chance to know you. He’ll hop right up to you and say hello. So it is important that you do respect his body language and his boundaries. He does love to snuggle but he’d be best suited for a mature home.”

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Bunnies, said Sotropa, are also not always suitable for young children because “most rabbits do resist being picked up, handled, cuddled.”

On the plus side, Dr. Hopkinz is “bursting with curiosity,” said Sotropa.

“So he’s always sniffing about, looking for the next adventure. He’s ready to explore using his nose, his paws, just everything around the house. He’s a pretty happy-go-lucky bunny.”

In the first few months in a new home, Sotropa says a rabbit needs a four-foot-by-four-foot wire pen with six to eight hours a day outside of it.

But once they get used to using a litter box they can free roam all day and night.

In that case, you need to “bunnyproof” your space, getting rid of any wires or anything ingestible that could be harmful, and use a baby gate for areas you don’t want the rabbit to be in.

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Dr. Hopkinz. Toronto Humane Society
Dr. Hopkinz. Toronto Humane Society

“Every bunny is unique so they’ll choose what they want to chew on,” said Sotropa.

“It is true they do need frequent chews because their teeth are ever-growing, So the action of chewing something is going to grind the teeth down. Additionally, it’s stimulating for them.”

Bunnies are vegetarians so they eat a mixed diet of 80% hay, 10% vegetables, 5% fruit and 5% pellets and they can be in a home with other pets, including other bunnies, as long as there is “a safe and supervised introduction with a sanctuary space.”

If you are interested in adopting Dr. Hopkinz please visit
www.torontohumanesociety.com/adopt-a-pet/adoption-process to check available appointment times to start the process.

UPDATE : Catara, a three-year-old, short-haired, female cat, featured in my last Forever Friend column in August, was adopted.

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